The Greatest Left Fielders of All-Time

hitting
Best with The Lumber
  • 1. Ted Williams
  • 2. Stan Musial
  • 3. Shoeless Joe Jackson
  • 4. Barry Bonds
  • 5. Pete Rose
fielding
Best with The Leather
  • 1. Carl Yastrzemski
  • 2. Joe Rudi
  • 3. Barry Bonds
  • 4. Fred Clarke
  • 5. Alex Gordon
Most Underrated Left Fielders
  • 1. Minnie Minoso
  • 2. Charlie Keller
  • 3. Jose Cruz
  • 4. Roy White
  • 5. Don Buford

The Top 100 Left Fielders

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  • 1. Ted Williams
  • 2. Barry Bonds
  • 3. Stan Musial
  • 4. Rickey Henderson
  • 5. Carl Yastrzemski
  • 6. Pete Rose
  • 7. Tim Raines
  • 8. Joe Jackson
  • 9. Minnie Minoso
  • 10. Al Simmons
  • 11. Ralph Kiner
  • 12. Goose Goslin
  • 13. Charlie Keller
  • 14. Billy Williams
  • 15. Willie Stargell
  • 16. Joe Medwick
  • 17. Manny Ramirez
  • 18. Lance Berkman
  • 19. Fred Clarke
  • 20. Sherry Magee
  • 21. Jose Cruz
  • 22. George Foster
  • 23. Monte Irvin
  • 24. Ken Williams
  • 25. Roy White
  • 26. Luis Gonzalez
  • 27. Albert Belle
  • 28. Jim Rice
  • 29. Matt Holliday
  • 30. Zack Wheat
  • 31. Lou Brock
  • 32. Bob Johnson
  • 33. Bobby Veach
  • 34. Sid Gordon
  • 35. Don Buford
  • 36. Lefty O'Doul
  • 37. Christian Yelich
  • 38. Alex Gordon
  • 39. Heinie Manush
  • 40. Brian Downing
  • 41. George Burns
  • 42. Jimmy Sheckard
  • 43. Carl Crawford
  • 44. Brett Gardner
  • 45. Lonnie Smith
  • 46. Moises Alou
  • 47. Augie Galan
  • 48. Frank Howard
  • 49. Yoenis Cespedes
  • 50. Ron Gant
  • 51. Ryan Braun
  • 52. Dusty Baker
  • 53. Hank Sauer
  • 54. Kevin Mitchell
  • 55. Hideki Matsui
  • 56. Del Ennis
  • 57. Starling Marte
  • 58. Chick Hafey
  • 59. Kevin McReynolds
  • 60. Alfonso Soriano
  • 61. Jeff Heath
  • 62. Gene Woodling
  • 63. Rico Carty
  • 64. Michael Brantley
  • 65. Greg Vaughn
  • 66. B.J. Surhoff
  • 67. Mike Greenwell
  • 68. Hal McRae
  • 69. Larry Hisle
  • 70. Jay Bay
  • 71. Cliff Floyd
  • 72. Topsy Hartsel
  • 73. Riggs Stephenson
  • 74. Joe Rudi
  • 75. Mike Donlin
  • 76. Ben Oglivie
  • 77. Shane Mack
  • 78. Gary Matthews Sr.
  • 79. Carlos Lee
  • 80. Greg Luzinski
  • 81. Bernard Gilkey
  • 82. George Stone
  • 83. Ryan Klesko
  • 84. Wally Moon
  • 85. Shannon Stewart
  • 86. Tommy Harper
  • 87. Tom Tresh
  • 88. Garret Anderson
  • 89. Willie Horton
  • 90. Don Baylor
  • 91. Rondell White
  • 92. Rusty Greer
  • 93. Bob Meusel
  • 94. Steve Kemp
  • 95. Tillie Walker
  • 96. John Stone
  • 97. Cleon Jones
  • 98. Bibb Falk
  • 99. George Bell
  • 100. Tommy Davis
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$posRnk
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$nameFirst $nameLast

     $yearFirst—$yearLast

SCORE CAREER LONG PEAK SHORT PEAK PRIME CHAMPIONSHIP
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What the Stats Mean in the Tables Above

Overall Player Score is the sum of the other numbers listed below, based on their relative weights.

A Player Score over 100 typically puts a player in the Top 100 all-time at their position. A Score of 200 is Hall of Fame worthy, and a score of 300 is indicative of an elite ballplayer.

The Score is set on a scale of 500. Babe Ruth’s mark is an even 500, setting the standard.

Career value in Wins Above Replacement, adjusted for length of schedule.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in his SEVEN best seasons.

This figure is adjusted in rare instances for missed time due to the color barrier or military service.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in his THREE best seasons.

This figure is adjusted in rare instances for missed time due to the color barrier or military service.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in his FIVE best CONSECUTIVE seasons.

This figure is adjusted in rare instances for missed time due to the color barrier or military service.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in seasons where his team won the pennant.

Adjustment for competition over time. This number is based on study by Bill James where he arrived at a QUOC number (Quality Of Competition). That QUOC number ranges from a low of about 500 to a high of 680 for modern baseball.

The QUOC number is averaged for a player over his career and compared to a standard of 680. A player gets the percentage of that ratio. For example, a player with a QUOC score of 614 will get 90.3% of his Career WAR in his final SCORE.

A second method for adjusting career WAR based on era. This method helps adjust for the fact that before 1951 (essentially) no black players were in MLB.

The formula basically removes 8 percent of Career WAR for every year the player debuted BEFORE 1951.

A 1 to 5 scale adjustment based on Post-Season Performance. Only about ten percent of players ranked receive an adjustment at all.

Three members of the 1919 Black Sox received a -1 score in this category.

A 1 to 5 scale adjustment for Intangibles. Reasons for this adjustment may include: leadership, player/manager success, social impact.

Jackie Robinson received a 5, while Barry Bonds and others who took performance-enhancing drugs or cheated the game, were given a negative adjustment here.

This adjustment doesn’t amount to enough to change an overall ranking much.

 

Player Score Formula and Weights

(CAREER x 2) +
(LONG PEAK x 1.75) +
(SHORT PEAK) +
(PRIME x 2) +
(CHAMP x .10) +
COMP ADJ + ERA ADJ + INT ADJ

That figure is multiplied by .8004 (to scale the SCORE to 500 for Babe Ruth).