The Greatest Right Fielders of All-Time

hitting
Best with The Lumber
  • 1. Babe Ruth
  • 2. Hank Aaron
  • 3. Frank Robinson
  • 4. Tony Gwynn
  • 5. Ichiro Suzuki
fielding
Best with The Leather
  • 1. Al Kaline
  • 2. Ichiro Suzuki
  • 3. Roberto Clemente
  • 4. Dwight Evans
  • 5. Dave Parker
Most Underrated Right Fielders
  • 1. Frank Robinson
  • 2. Larry Walker
  • 3. Harry Heilmann
  • 4. Bobby Abreu
  • 5. Enos Slaughter

The Top 100 Right Fielders

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  • 1. Babe Ruth
  • 2. Hank Aaron
  • 3. Frank Robinson
  • 4. Mel Ott
  • 5. Roberto Clemente
  • 6. Al Kaline
  • 7. Reggie Jackson
  • 8. Ichiro Suzuki
  • 9. Larry Walker
  • 10. Harry Heilmann
  • 11. Tony Gwynn
  • 12. Paul Waner
  • 13. Dwight Evans
  • 14. Vladimir Guerrero
  • 15. Bobby Abreu
  • 16. Sam Crawford
  • 17. Enos Slaughter
  • 18. Mookie Betts
  • 19. Dave Winfield
  • 20. Bobby Bonds
  • 21. Reggie Smith
  • 22. Sammy Sosa
  • 23. Elmer Flick
  • 24. Gary Sheffield
  • 25. Dave Parker
  • 26. Tony Oliva
  • 27. Chuck Klein
  • 28. Jack Clark
  • 29. Rusty Staub
  • 30. Rocky Colavito
  • 31. Darryl Strawberry
  • 32. Brian Giles
  • 33. Jose Bautista
  • 34. Ross Youngs
  • 35. Johnny Callison
  • 36. Felipe Alou
  • 37. Giancarlo Stanton
  • 38. Jesse Barfield
  • 39. Kiki Cuyler
  • 40. J.D. Drew
  • 41. Ken Singleton
  • 42. Kirk Gibson
  • 43. Roger Maris
  • 44. Sam Rice
  • 45. Harry Hooper
  • 46. Tim Salmon
  • 47. Tommy Henrich
  • 48. Shawn Green
  • 49. Jason Heyward
  • 50. Magglio Ordonez
  • 51. David Justice
  • 52. Babe Herman
  • 53. Paul O'Neill
  • 54. Bill Nicholson
  • 55. Gavvy Cravath
  • 56. Bob Allison
  • 57. Tommy Holmes
  • 58. Brian Jordan
  • 59. Reggie Sanders
  • 60. Dixie Walker
  • 61. Bryce Harper
  • 62. Shin-Soo Choo
  • 63. Justin Upton
  • 64. Al Smith
  • 65. Juan Gonzalez
  • 66. Roy Cullenbine
  • 67. Raul Mondesi
  • 68. Nick Markakis
  • 69. Ken Griffey Sr.
  • 70. Carl Furillo
  • 71. Hunter Pence
  • 72. Alex Rios
  • 73. Von Hayes
  • 74. Jayson Werth
  • 75. Nelson Cruz
  • 76. George Hendrick
  • 77. Harold Baines
  • 78. Hank Bauer
  • 79. J.D. Martinez
  • 80. Sixto Lezcano
  • 81. Terry Puhl
  • 82. Elmer Valo
  • 83. Carlos Gonzalez
  • 84. Jackie Jensen
  • 85. Richie Zisk
  • 86. Taffy Wright
  • 87. Wally Moses
  • 88. John Titus
  • 89. Vic Wertz
  • 90. Josh Reddick
  • 91. Socks Seybold
  • 92. Yasiel Puig
  • 93. Jose Canseco
  • 94. Jim Northrup
  • 95. Ival Goodman
  • 96. George Selkirk
  • 97. Willard Marshall
  • 98. Bake McBride
  • 99. Trot Nixon
  • 100. Cody Bellinger
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$posRnk
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$nameFirst $nameLast

     $yearFirst—$yearLast

SCORE CAREER LONG PEAK SHORT PEAK PRIME CHAMPIONSHIP
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What the Stats Mean in the Tables Above

Overall Player Score is the sum of the other numbers listed below, based on their relative weights.

A Player Score over 100 typically puts a player in the Top 100 all-time at their position. A Score of 200 is Hall of Fame worthy, and a score of 300 is indicative of an elite ballplayer.

The Score is set on a scale of 500. Babe Ruth’s mark is an even 500, setting the standard.

Career value in Wins Above Replacement, adjusted for length of schedule.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in his SEVEN best seasons.

This figure is adjusted in rare instances for missed time due to the color barrier or military service.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in his THREE best seasons.

This figure is adjusted in rare instances for missed time due to the color barrier or military service.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in his FIVE best CONSECUTIVE seasons.

This figure is adjusted in rare instances for missed time due to the color barrier or military service.

The player’s WAR (Wins Above Replacement) in seasons where his team won the pennant.

Adjustment for competition over time. This number is based on study by Bill James where he arrived at a QUOC number (Quality Of Competition). That QUOC number ranges from a low of about 500 to a high of 680 for modern baseball.

The QUOC number is averaged for a player over his career and compared to a standard of 680. A player gets the percentage of that ratio. For example, a player with a QUOC score of 614 will get 90.3% of his Career WAR in his final SCORE.

A second method for adjusting career WAR based on era. This method helps adjust for the fact that before 1951 (essentially) no black players were in MLB.

The formula basically removes 8 percent of Career WAR for every year the player debuted BEFORE 1951.

A 1 to 5 scale adjustment based on Post-Season Performance. Only about ten percent of players ranked receive an adjustment at all.

Three members of the 1919 Black Sox received a -1 score in this category.

A 1 to 5 scale adjustment for Intangibles. Reasons for this adjustment may include: leadership, player/manager success, social impact.

Jackie Robinson received a 5, while Barry Bonds and others who took performance-enhancing drugs or cheated the game, were given a negative adjustment here.

This adjustment doesn’t amount to enough to change an overall ranking much.

 

Player Score Formula and Weights

(CAREER x 2) +
(LONG PEAK x 1.75) +
(SHORT PEAK) +
(PRIME x 2) +
(CHAMP x .10) +
COMP ADJ + ERA ADJ + INT ADJ

That figure is multiplied by .8004 (to scale the SCORE to 500 for Babe Ruth).