1990s Baseball

The Ultimate Cardinal: Willie McGee

In 1996, after a five-year absence, McGee came back to the Cardinals. He was 37, but he had some good baseball left in him, and he played four more seasons in Cardinal red.

Tony Gwynn: Pride of San Diego

Just when baseball seemed to be getting drunk on home runs, Tony Gwynn emerged to reveal the beauty of hitting a baseball.

Barry Larkin: Cincinnati’s Greatest Shortstop

Of the great shortstops, Larkin had the most complete skills: he could run as fast as Eric Davis, he had the strongest arm in a generation, and only Ozzie was better with the glove.

Was Jeter better than Nomar and ARod?

The career of Derek Jeter is a perfect illustration of the multitude of factors that go into a Hall of Fame discussion. And rightly so. The contemporary

Five moves that helped land Gillick in the Hall

Normally, trading a future Hall of Fame player is the death knell for a major league general manager. But when Pat Gillick did it he laid the groundwork for historic success. In 1999, Gillick, with impressive credentials on his resume, replaced Woody Woodward as General Manager of the Seattle Mariners. The team’s superstar center fielder Ken Griffey Jr. was grumbling about the lack of support on the roster and issued a trade demand. Woodward had famously told reporters, “I don’t want to be the guy remembered for trading Ken Griffey Jr. away from the Mariners.” Gillick had no such fear.

Sparky Anderson was a man of hyperbole and principle

When the Cincinnati Reds named 36-year old George Anderson as their manager during the 1969-1970 off-season, newspapers in the city asked “Sparky Who?” Within a few years, he was one of the few men in sports who was known by one name.